Entertainment

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company: Season 39

Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company 2018-2019 Season

I love working with Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company. Their productions are always so creative and diverse, and it translates into really fun shoots. Woolly Mammoth’s 2018-19 season features an energizing array of plays by new voices, Woolly veterans, Obie Award-winners, Pulitzer finalists, and familiar partners: Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, Rajiv Joseph, Heidi Schreck, Aziza Barnes, Mike Daisey, The Second City, and the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre.

Thank you to Director of Brand and Marketing Gwydion Suilebhan

Hair & Makeup by Dean Krapf lluminaire Salon

Wardrobe by Pascale Lemaire of T.H.E Artist Agency

 

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Miss Piggy Goes to Washington

Miss Piggy Goes to Washington

The Jim Henson Legacy Foundation donated 21 Muppets to the Smithsonian. Smithsonian Magazine hired me to photograph Miss Piggy visiting a couple of the most storied objects housed there.

Pairing Miss Piggy with the Hope Diamond involved a secret, predawn escort to the Natural History Museum and an armed guard at the museum’s Gems Hall. I got to photograph the Muppet Diva wearing the necklace holding the 45.53 –carat stone.

It wasn’t your typical fashion shoot.

Miss Piggy wanted to try on Dorothy’s Ruby Slippers. I scouted the slippers which were on display, and visited with the curator who was nice but told me that the Slippers couldn’t come out of the display case – don’t even THINK about taking the slippers out of the case – and to figure it out. So we moved in the day of the shoot and well, we figured it out, photographing thru the display case – careful to not have any reflections.

You’ve got to make the Muppet, and the curator, happy.

Check out the full article here

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Smithsonian Magazine: Bigfoot

Yes, he’s real!

Legends like Bigfoot, the Loch Ness Monster and the Bermuda Triangle were as much of an influence to me growing up as the Lone Ranger, Zorro and the Two-Gun Kid.

Smithsonian Magazine Associate photo editor Donny Bajohr reached out to see if I was interested in taking on an assignment photographing Bigfoot.

THE Bigfoot?! Count me in.

I always love working with the Smithsonian, and they thought it would be cool to create a miniature set in the vein of the famous grainy “video footage” from the Patterson–Gimlin film.

Bigfoot will be September’s “American Icon” featured in the Prologue section of Smithsonian Magazine.

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Robot Love

Robot Love

I am honored to have my C-3PO images for Smithsonian Magazine selected in the Editorial category for the juried Communication Arts 2018 Photo Annual issue. It won’t ever not be exciting to be included in those pages. 

Each project I do hits home for different audiences in different ways, but these C-3PO images have been some of my most widely resonate. This droid has a firm grip on our national (and beyond) cultural memory. It was a unique challenge to photograph this icon as a piece of machinery, a sum of metal luster and wires – apart from but as a compliment to everyone’s knowledge of and affection for this American character.

I photographed C3PO for the National Treasures feature of Smithsonian Magazine (as apt a place for him as you could come up with) where it was selected the Most Powerful Image for that publication for 2017.

Thanks to Smithsonian Photo Editor, and frequent collaborator, Jeff Campagna. And to Communication Arts

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Virginia Opera

Virginia Opera

The Virginia Opera project is another collaboration between Cade Martin and the always creative, Jamin Hoyle

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La Traviata, Washington National Opera

La Traviata, Washington National Opera

With the release of the 2018-19 WNO schedule, I am thrilled to share these rich, dramatic portraits that give promise of the story these actors will tell as Violetta and Alfredo when they take the stage for the new production of Verdi’s “La Traviata” in October.

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. is a legendary institution, and it is always an honor to work with them and Creative Director Scott Bushnell.

With the talented Jacqueline Echols and Joshua Guerrero.

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Delta Blues Promotional Package

Delta Blues Promotional Package

The intersection of what we love and what we do – that’s the sweet spot right?I have always had a deep affection for the Mississippi Delta, and I’ve been making photographs for what we’ll call a good while now. This blues portrait project was that spot; just me and my camera in Clarksdale, Mississippi, capturing the characters of the blues. Making the images is what I do. Sharing them is someone else’s sweet spot. To share these I turned to designer David Calderley of Graphic Therapy. And at the intersection of that brilliant designer – who also happens to be a guy with whom I’ve shared both beer and adventure, I ended up with this. Both- pulp board. Die cut containing 10-panel concertina fold – and a short story about what I do, and what I dig.

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Geeking Out On the Job: Face to Face with C-3PO

Geeking Out On the Job: Face to Face with C-3PO

Working once again with Smithsonian Magazine, I was charged with photographing C-3PO for a section of the magazine called “National Treasure” at the National Museum of American History in Washington, DC.

While we couldn’t touch him, I could see and feel the craft that went into bringing his character to life on the screen. Focusing in on the droid’s hinges, lines and luster – the physical realness of this character – I did my best to channel the cinematic origin, to capture a movie still not a product shot. Thank you, as always, to Jeff Campagna for the opportunities to photograph these pieces of history, to Smithsonian Magazine for being a true giant in chronicling the objects of our collective history and culture, and to LucasFilm and Disney for your imaginations.

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Enjoying the Sights on Mercy Street! – PBS Mercy Street

Enjoying the Sights on Mercy Street! – PBS Mercy Street

Working with PBS on this project for their Mercy Street mini series was incredible and I loved every minute of it. Going in, we did not have a lot of specific creative direction other than a classical approach similar to what PBS had done with their monster hit Downton Abbey. That influence was a great jumping off point, but I was also interested in creating something a little more modern and contemporary to set this series apart. To achieve that, I set up a set within a set to create a classical look melded with a more modern lighting design and a subtly textured backdrop.

We delivered the images and I didn’t immediately hear back – crickets – I thought maybe they hated the photographs. I really liked them and wanted to plow ahead, which I did. On set (in Petersburg, Virginia) we had an old 20×20 silk as the backdrop.  I also hunted down a location for the exterior images of Civil War era Petersburg, these images of cobblestone streets and buildings were layered in post with the in-photograph silks. We used the silk as a base background and I really wanted the focus to stay on the characters so the background elements needed to be a  “there but not there” type of thing – providing texture and a modern nod without overwhelming the images or the subject. Working with my partners at Sugar Digital, we worked back-and-forth to find the right layering balance so that the painterly background effect was there to support but not distract from the subjects. The colors and textures of the period wardrobe, along with the actors’ faces were a striking focal point, and I was after tones that would marry well with each other and could straddle the historical/contemporary setting of the images.

With the updated backgrounds, I now loved the images and sent them to the client. This time the client responded immediately that they loved the look and wanted to create the entire campaign around what we’d created.

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Greetings from the Magical Forest

Greetings from the Magical Forest

New York Philharmonic

One of the things I loved most about the concept was how it needed to be as much about the environment as it would be about the narrative — an elegant pied-piper in an enchanted forest setting, charming a group of curious characters. This piece brings to life the delightful sound of NY Phil’s 2016 Biennial season, entitled “Let’s Play” by combining a very magical Northern California location with the Phil’s french-hornist, Leelanee Sterrett and an audience of curious carousel-horses.

Sometimes the reality of a project dictates the approach. I generally pride myself on photographing as much as possible in camera. For this project, the client wanted me to keep with that formula and that was my initial plan. I was ready to go and after a few back and forths and with a final green light it was “let’s go find a location and put all of the elements of the image out there.” While this was a doable idea, Ms. Sterrett was leaving for a tour in Europe within the week. So we went ahead and photographed her in a studio in NYC before I went to scout the final location. Not only did I have to find the right location for the creative brief for this project, BUT I now had to find the perfect location that offered the same natural lighting that we had created in the New York studio. Working with producer Catherine Schramm, we found the forest two hours north of San Francisco and then I went to a Scooby-Doo Circus south of LA in Riverside, CA where we photographed carousel horses.

With these moving parts and challenges of time and space, the best way to answer the creative call of this project was to commit to a composite photograph. I worked carefully in each step of the shoot to ensure that every component would be as symbiotic to the whole as possible, the whole then becoming a magical sum of its parts. Aiming to have things line up seamlessly, CG horses were also created with the pros at Luminous Creative Imaging to match all of the pockets of different light that existed in the forest image – some horses are in open shade, others are back lit or side lit from the direct sun.  Once each of the pieces of the image were layered and composed, the color and tones were massaged to radiate the playful feeling of a magical forest.

Our making-of is here:

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ARS NOVA

ARS NOVA

This was a really fun Off-Broadway project with Naomi Usher of Studio Usher for Ars Nova. Three really distinct images, Sundown, Yellow Moon and Night Sky Backdrop, represent the arc of the plays.

K-POP: K-Pop is such a powerful cultural force that transcends music and geography. The visual cues that define the genre are such a joy to concept for photography. We used a color-block backdrop, a fierce female model in highly stylized make-up and outfit. I aimed to subvert the image to portray her energy as slightly militant, angry and icy instead of cute, poppy and teenaged. K-Pop grown up.  

LUCKY ONES: We styled actress Jo Lampert in rock-n-roll angel teenager garb. We captured her sweaty, in the midst of a hard-core dance move, the effect brings on the feeling of being right on the edge of her pushing herself just too far physically. It was important for the image to invite the viewer to feelmovement, maybe even exhaustion, in this still image.  

SUNDOWN, YELLOW MOON: Evoking elements of wistfulness and an ethereal longing, we featured a young woman, against a night sky backdrop, light low with her partially obscured by shadows against a backdrop of textural woodsy foliage. The juxtaposition of a sky full of sparkly stars delivers a hint of magic to this image.

Our model is styled in a summer dress that hints at the south. Loose hair and a gaze turned to something we can’t see, though the misty, ambiguous surroundings hint at vastness. She is set in a time and place that suggests deep thoughts and big questions.

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The Washington National Opera: Anna Bolena

TENSE, DARK AND STRONG FOR THE WASHINGTON NATIONAL OPERA

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. is a legendary institution, and it is always an honor to work with them and creative director Scott Bushnell. The Washington National Opera imported Stephen Lawless’ production of Donizetti’s “Anna Bolena”.  The performance was deemed a tour de force for the American dramatic soprano, Sondra Radvanovsky, and my marching orders were to create a fitting portrait of Ms. Radvanovsky. No small feat. As Anna Bolena, she was locked up in the Tower of London, so we agreed it needed to be tense, and a bit dark. The focus on her face set off by a shadowy background that hints at the tumult surrounding her.

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Virginia Opera

Add Your Heading Text Here

As an admirer of the Virginia Opera and it’s mission to create transformative cultural experiences through passionate storytelling and beautiful music, I was more than excited to get the brief from one of my favorite creative directors Jamin Hoyle, “to make opera sexy”.  Ultimately that meant tight portraits that would share the page with bold text.  As stand alone pieces these images are unflinching, visceral representation of each opera. They are a stark departure from any lingering stereotypes that the Opera is a stuffy affair.  Pascale Lemaire, Linh Nguyen and Viktoriia Bowers were brought in for wardrobe, hair and makeup, respectively, and were so phenomenal – and their creativity and vision also pop right out of these photographs. Ultimately, the photos served as the launching point for a larger brand refurbishment that we conducted through the design of the brochure.

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Woolly Mammoth – Season 37

Woolly Mammoth - Season 37

or 2017, their 37th season, I reunited with the creative mind of Jamin Hoyle for second helping of posters for Wooly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington DC. Collaborating with the talented theatre team, we worked with custom-painted canvas backdrops, and a home-made space suit to achieve this series of dramatic, theatrical and provocative posters – perfectly suited for a theatre that always pushes artistic boundaries.

Check out the making of video here!

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For 2017, their 37th season, I reunited with the creative mind of Jamin Hoyle for second helping of posters for Wooly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington DC. Collaborating with the talented theatre team, we worked with custom-painted canvas backdrops, and a home-made space suit to achieve this series of dramatic, theatrical and provocative posters – perfectly suited for a theatre that always pushes artistic boundaries.

Check out the making of video here!

https://vimeo.com/182131238

Supporting the Arts

Supporting the Arts

The image, “Supporting the Arts,” is the result of a project with RP3 for Norfolk Southern Railway. Norfolk Southern has been a titan of American industry for over 35 years, with roots in some of the Eastern United State’s first railroad companies. To promote and recognize their support for the performing arts, I had the pleasure of working with the energetic and really fun Jean-Pierre Bovie, Creative Director at RP3. For this dramatic, photo-driven print ad I worked with a ballet dancer to have her shadow create the shape of a horse, which mimics the logo of the railway. With a clean background, the final image is uncluttered and focused like a spotlight. The juxtaposition of art and industry was interesting to conceptualize and capture.  

I am honored to share that for our efforts, we were honored that this ad received a Gold award at the annual American Advertising Awards DC, held at The Newseum. This award show is always a great time to catch up with people and to see the cool work – from the funny to the sublime – coming out of the DC scene. Thank you to AAF DC and all of DC’s brilliant ad shops for another year of exceptional advertising.

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Baby Screams Miracle

Baby Screams Miracle

My partnership with Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company has yielded a collection of posters as interesting and wide-ranging as their productions. The New York Times does a monthly piece that explores the story and the art behind theatre posters, aptly titled Behind the Poster. And what do you know, February featured a poster I did for Woolly’s first play of the 2017 season, Baby Screams Miracle. I’m proud to work with a theatre that always pushes artistic boundaries, and this write up is a pleasant surprise.

Take a look and if you want a little behind the Behind the Poster, my photographers take: 

For Woolly Mammoth’s 2017 season – their 37th – I reunited with powerhouse creative director, Jamin Hoyle for a second helping of posters for the DC fixture. Working closely with Gwydion Suilebhan, the theatre’s director of brand and marketing as well, we aimed to capture the feeling of both a physical storm and one raging within. Baby Screams Miracle, begs for a dark and atmospheric look. The hand painted backdrop is a dark blue-green with brush strokes that mimic the movement of a storm. Our model is pregnant and made to look wet and wind blown. Her shimmery, smoky eyes give us a gateway into her internal storm as the viewer is challenged to read her ecstatic expression as laughter or tears. For the subject to appear to be solely lit by candle stub and proudly all captured in camera, I staged our lighting to simulate what would be cast by a candle stub in the rain, mainly her face illuminated with the murky suggestion of the whipping wind and rain behind her.​  

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Deutsch LA. Star Wars. Target.

Deutsch LA. Star Wars. Target.

Any one of these names would be an attractive project. Put them together, throw in a little Disney magic, a sprinkle of Lucas Films and I’m not sure the whole thing wasn’t a dream.

I couldn’t have been more excited to get the brief from Deutsch for a project to photograph the latest Star Wars toys for Target – toys which would be released for the upcoming holiday season.  Wow. Amazing. Yes, yes, yes.

Throughout my career I’ve always been defined – you’re a reportage photographer, a corporate photographer, a dance photographer. It’s natural to try to fit people, and their work, into a neat little space. But I honestly feel that all of my work has been a continuation of itself regardless of genre. So though I’m not a “toy photographer,” I was beyond excited to be considered for this project.

From the first call, it was clear that the agency saw past any proverbial boxes. They saw what I’ve just recently started to realize – that the movies and comics of my youth have been some of my greatest and most important influences in my life and my picture-making. These were key ingredients in who they were looking for — a photographer that loved cinema and also harbored an inner-nerd.

As timing would have it, I was on a Griswald-esque family vacation when this opportunity presented itself. While driving up, down and around the West Coast I pulled my two boys into the pre-production mix.  “What are you seeing here,“ “what would you like to see happen” – one of the first things out of their mouths was “Do we have to follow the rules?” and “I’d like to see the hatch open and suck them out into space!” Kids. Funny and I’ll remember it forever. But, in truth their perspective also allowed me to start seeing things from a fresh point of view and channel the excitement of kids – the very kids who would take those toys and create their own rebel worlds.

The agency was just as excited as I was to envision the scenes that these toys would inhabit. I immediately imagined the toys as characters in a stop-motion film – pulling inspiration from the original King Kong, to Ray Harryhausen, to Jason and the Argonauts, to the genius of the recent film Anomalisa and the amazing stop-motion work from Laika. And they were totally on board with a cinematic approach, with everything captured in-camera.

Fast (and I mean fast) forward a few weeks and I’m in LA for a three day studio shoot.  And while it always takes a village to pull something like this off, I am indebted to Deutsch for entrusting me to create these worlds, to the retouchers at Sugar Digital and to Amy Whitehouse, the producer that also led me to a kindred spirit set designer, Todd Davis, who was just as excited as I was to create these authentic small worlds. Wow. Deutsch LA. Target. Star Wars.

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Dead Man Walking

Dead Man Walking

Some institutions live up to their legend. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington D.C. is such an institution. I was fortunate to be called on to work with the Kennedy Center again, this time for their presentation of The Washington National Opera production of Dead Man Walking. It was my distinct pleasure to have the chance to work with Scott Bushnell, the advertising creative director at the Kennedy Center. His vision for this poster was a dark joy to bring to life…or death. Inspired by the concept, I used an atmospheric approach to the lighting design, hard expressionistic light that would expose the dark side of humanity revealed in this story. The show kicked off a five show run February 25th.

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Mercy Street

Mercy Street

When PBS invited me to create something engaging to promote Ridley Scott’s new Civil War production, “Mercy Street,” my team and I went to work exploring and transforming the fabrics and colors of the era. I created a uniquely textured and modern scene into which we would immerse the period-piece subjects. The final result is a campaign of striking, heroic portraits that promote the rich, multi-layered stories and characters of the series.

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La Bohème at The Kennedy Center

La Bohème at The Kennedy Center

The Washington National Opera’s production of La Bohème.

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Ode to Abby Road

Ode to Abby Road

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Woolly Mammoth – Season 35

Woolly Mammoth - Season 35

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There are times when work looks and feels like play.  Such was the case working with RP3 Agency for DC’s Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company and their 35th anniversary season. We ended up with a visual feast of these engaging and original posters that really capture the personality and mission of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company.

SideShow at The Kennedy Center

SideShow at The Kennedy Center

Emily Padgett and Erin Davie from The Kennedy Center’s new production of “Side Show”!

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Life in the Bayou

Life in the Bayou

I’ve always loved the bayou outside of New Orleans. On one of my last projects in Louisiana I stayed an extra day and hired an ol’ Cajun French guy with a boat to take me out to shoot and explore the bayou. I’ve been a big comic book guy since I was a little kid, so in collaboration with Souverein, I wanted to do a project inspired by POGO, a comic strip that started in the late 1940’s. I was also inspired by A Cajun Night Before Christmas, a children’s book.

Check out the PDN article here.

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GENLUX Magazine

GENLUX Magazine

Creative Director: Stephen Kamifuji
Photographer: Cade Martin 
Stylist: Pascale Lemaire 
Model: Tanya / Fenton Moon, New York 
Art Direction: David Calderley 
Hair and Makeup: Patti Nelson 

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ONEderful – One Show

This was more work with the great Design Army, here we collaborated on a project for The 2012 ONE Show global campaign. The One Show, hosted by the One Club is the premiere international advertising award show, and it continuously sets the industry standard for creative advertising. We created a whimsical world inhabited by baby animals and cuddly bunnies, talking bears and happy clouds, representing the moment that deadline stress gives way to the creative euphoria that that one great, creative idea can bring. Our ONEderland was a dreamy place where the creatives and animals romp together through flowers and endless big ideas.

Photography: Cade Martin

Creative: Design Army

Hair/Make-Up: Janice Kinigopoulous/T.H.E. Artist Agency
Stylist: Polly Spadavecchia/ T.H.E. Artist Agency
Flowers/Gardner: Sidra Forman
Producer/Scout: Carol Flashier
Model: Seth Callaway